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In this article, we will take a second more practical look at Moodle Resources and Activities in order to provide an example of how they can be combined into a predictable section or class structure. As a teacher, one of your greatest challenges is designing the curriculum for your course. Moodle offers so many options that there is s tendency to try to jam several options into the same course. But the problem with adding random Moodle activities to different class sections is that too much variety can confuse students. Your course can wind up turning into a pile of random learning bricks rather than providing your students with a well built house.

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I therefore recommend starting with a simple and predictable class or section structure whereby each class follows a similar routine of Moodle resources and activities. Here is the course structure we use with most of our courses at College in the Clouds:

#1 Class or Section Reading.

#2 Supplemental Reading.

#3 Class or Section Video.

#4 Supplemental Videos.

#5 Class or Section Glossary of Terms.

#6 Class or Section Video Conferences.

#7 Class or Section Quiz.

#8 Class or Section Assignment (aka Mastery Project)

#9 Appointments with Individual Students.

#10 Student Project Demonstrations and/or Presentations

Let's take a closer look at each of these class or section elements.

#1 Class or Section Reading
While all of our courses at College in the Clouds are on the same Moodle "college" website, we also have a sister website for each of our individual courses. For example, there is a separate sister website for the course, Better Word Processing at this link: https://betterwordprocessing.com/

Each sister website uses Joomla to create and organize readings for every class section in the given course. These readings are organized into about 9 chapters with each chapter having four readings for a total of 36 readings. Each reading is about 10 to 20 pages of text combined with 10 to 20 images for a total of about 500 pages of reading with about 500 images.

The reason we use Joomla rather than Moodle to post readings for each class or section is that Joomla is much easier than Moodle for organizing dozens of readings with hundreds of images. It is very important to balance text with matching images as many students are visual learners who may learn more from looking at images than from reading text. However, it is important that these images be well organized into chapters and sections.

Joomla is much better than Moodle not only in terms of organizing articles and images but also in terms of creating categories and menu items. Therefore, each Moodle class section in each of our ten courses will begin with a URL link to a reading we have already created on our our Joomla sister website. These course readings are essential primary readings and form the foundation of our course.

Course Print Book Option
Some students have trouble learning just by reading from a computer screen. They prefer a printed book which they can read off line and which has space for writing notes in the margins. Print books offer students a more active type of learning than merely reading from a computer screen. We therefore publish print books on each course which students can buy from our College Book Store. We explain how you can publish your own course books in our course and website called Create and Publish your Own Book dot com.

https://createandpublishyourownbook.com/

#2 Supplemental Reading
Our course readings may be followed by one of more supplemental readings. These supplemental readings are not as essential as our primary course readings and may consist of a series of key references for students wishing to learn more about the topics introduced in the course primary reading.

#3 Class or Section Video
While some students learn more from reading, others learn more from watching videos. It is generally not wise to load videos directly into your Virtual Private Server (VPS) as videos have very large file sizes and will quickly use up all of the disc space on your VPS. Instead, videos should be posted on a separate Video Channel website, such as Youtube, and then linked to your Moodle class or section web pages. We explain how you can create your own videos and post them to your own video channel in our course and website called Create Your Own Video Channel dot org.

https://createyourownvideochannel.org/

#4 Supplemental Videos
Our course videos may be followed by one of more supplemental videos. These supplemental videos are not as essential as our primary course videos and are provided for students wishing to learn more about the topics introduced in the course primary reading and video.

#5 Class or Section Glossary of Terms
Each class section will likely introduce some new terms that students may not fully understand. It is therefore useful to create a Glossary of these terms. This glossary is also a useful review of the important concepts introduced in the class section. The glossary also can help students identify key terms and concepts that may become questions in the class section quiz.

#6 Class or Section Video Conferences
What is too often missing from online courses is a chance for students to ask questions about topics introduced in the course readings and videos. In our next chapter, we will explain how to improve the appearance and structure of your Moodle website with the Fordson theme. The Fordson theme is compatible with a free open source video conferencing tool called Jitsi. Jitsi is much better and offers much more privacy for video conferencing than the commercial Zoom video conferencing. We will explain how to use Jitsi video conferencing in a later chapter.

#7 Class or Section Quiz
Moodle allows you to not only create your own quizzes but also gives you tools that help you grade your quizzes. These quizzes are important because they help you and your students confirm that they have learned the essential concepts and terms introduced in the class section.

#8 Class or Section Assignment (aka Mastery Project)
Each section or class session should end with an assignment where the student completes an activity showing that they have mastered the skill introduced in the class. Each individual assignment can then build towards completion of a final course project. Am example of a class project building to a course project would be creation of series of simple website pages that can eventually be combined into a complete website.

#9 Appointments with Individual Students
Some students lack the confidence to actively participate in class or group video conference sessions. It is therefore important to provide time to interact directly with each student to answer their questions and provide them with feedback and assistance on their course assignments and course projects. This assistance should include helping students prepare for their final class project.

#10 Student Project Demonstrations and/or Presentations
There should be time during the final week of the course for students to present their course project to the course instructors and other course students. This class projects can be individual projects or projects created by groups of students. Ideally, class projects can be donated to the course and serve as templates to help future students with their learning.

Other Moodle Resources and Activities
It is also important to ask students for suggestions on how you can improve your online course. Thus, students should be encouraged to fill out an online feedback form at the end of your online course.

Hybrid Course or Fully Online Course?
The benefit of a fully online course is that you can enroll students from all over the world and they do not have to be physically located in the same city in order to participate in your course. However, there is a problem with online courses in that there is less student social interaction and engagement than in real person to person courses.

Students are much more likely to complete courses in which there is a social engagement component. It is therefore desirable to combine in person learning with online learning by scheduling in person meetings periodically during the course so students can meet other students and build relationships with other students. If some students are not able to attend these in person classes, you can set up a computer screen in the real classroom that allows remote students to also participate in the real classroom. An online course is a useful supplement. But the reality is that there is no substitute for real classroom learning experiences.

What's Next?
In the next chapter, we will review how to use the Fordson theme to improve the appearance and structure of our Moodle website.

In addition to Moodle Resources and Activities, Moodle also offers 30 different kinds of learning blocks. Moodle blocks are boxes of content which can be added to the side of any page in Moodle. Some blocks can also be added to the main or middle content area of a Moodle course page. Click on Add Block in the Side Menu to display this list. Scroll down the list to see the entire list of 30 different learning blocks all organized in alphabetical order:

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An administrator can manage Moodle's blocks for the site in Site administration > Plugins > Blocks > Manage blocks, including any contributed blocks that have been added.

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Log in and go to your Dashboard page to see several blocks on display:

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There are two blocks in the main content area (Recently accessed courses and Course overview). Then in the right side menu, there are 6 additional blocks (Timeline, Private Files, Online Users, Latest badges, Calendar and Events).

How to Hide Blocks on the Dashboard page
To make the dashboard page less cluttered, let's high the Online Users box and the Latest Badges box. To hide some of the blocks on the Dashboard page, go to Site administration > Plugins > Blocks > Manage blocks. Scroll down to Online users. Then click on the EYE icon to hide the box. Then click on the Latest Badges EYE icon to hide it. Then view the Dashboard again.

How to Add Blocks to the Dashboard page
To add a block to the Dashboard page, go to the Home page and click Turn Editing On. This will bring up the Add Block Menu Item in the left side menu. Click on the Dashboard page. Then click Add a Block. Click HTML. Then click on the Block Edit wheel to add title and text.

Then in the Block Edit screen, click Where it appears and change the location from right to the main content area. Alternately, you can also just drag the box to where you want it to appear. Then click Save Changes. Then click Stop Customizing this page. Here is our revised custom dashboard:

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In this article, we will review a few of the most important blocks. These include Blog Menu, Calendar, HTML, Latest news, Main Menu, Timeline and Upcoming Events.

#1 Blogs and Blog Menu Block
Blogs are a form of online journal for communicating with other class participants. Blogs are organized as a chronological series of posts created by the author of the blog. Blogs usually are written by one person, typically the teacher, although some blogs can be authored by groups of people such as all members of a class. Blogs in Moodle are user based - each user can have their own blog.

Blogs in Moodle are enabled by default. They may be disabled by a site administrator in Site administration > Advanced features by setting the blog visibility to 'Disable blog system completely'. In your Blog preferences (via the User menu > Preferences) you can set how many blog entries are displayed on a page.

The blog menu block provides links to view all blog entries and to add a new entry - plus context-sensitive links for adding an entry about the course or a particular activity (if blog associations are enabled for the site and if a user has appropriate permissions).

Here is an example of a blog menu block on an Assignment page:

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#2 Calendar Block
The Calendar block displays events from the Calendar, such as activity dates, and any of the following manually added events. These events include Site events (event viewable in all courses - created by admin users), Category events (event viewable by all participants of courses within the category - created by admin users or other users with course category permissions), Course events (event viewable by all course participants - created by teachers) and Groups events (event viewable only by members of a group - created by teachers). Here is what the Calendar Block looks like:

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#3 HTML Block
The HTML block is flexible and can incorporate a variety of functions and uses in the content or right side bar area. It uses the standard Moodle Text editor for formatting text, adding images or creating links. Switching to code view allows you to add any valid HTML. This enables embedding video, sounds and other files which can add unique elements to a course or site page. Here is an example of an HTML block with an image:

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#4 Latest News Latest Announcements Block
Recent posts made in the Announcements forum are displayed in the Latest announcements block, along with a link to older archived news. The Latest announcements block displays 3 news items. This may be changed from the Edit settings link in course administration. Here is an example of the Latest Announcements Block:

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#5 Main Menu Block
The main menu block can be added to the front page of your Moodle website by a site administrator. Resources and activities can then be added to the front page. For example, you can create a side menu for your Moodle site in addition to a custom menu items at the top of your site. Thus you could have pages "About", "Contact" and so on. To add the menu and menu items, turn on the editing on the front page. From the "Add block" link, add the main menu block if it is not already present. From "Add an activity or resource" choose Page and add your information. Repeat for other pages. When the editing is turned off the menu block appears as in the screenshot below:

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#6 Upcoming Events Block
The Upcoming events block displays events from the Calendar in a summarized list. Here is an example of the Upcoming Events Block:

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#7 Timeline Block
The Timeline block provides an overview of deadlines and is displayed by default on the Dashboard. Deadlines may be sorted by Overdue or Upcoming due dates (1) or by due dates per course (2). Here is an example of the Timeline Block:

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Additional Moodle Block Plugins
In addition to using the blocks included in the standard download, other Moodlers have developed more than 200 blocks which they have shared with the Moodle community. You can download these contributed blocks from the Moodle.org Moodle Plugins directory

Here is a link to Moodle Block Plugins

https://moodle.org/plugins/browse.php?list=category&id=2

Here is a table of some of the most popular Moodle Block Plugins

Block Name

Number of Plugins

Completion Progress Bars

3

Grading Organizers

1

Quick Mail

1

Course Module Navigation

1

Learning Plan

1

Mentor Manager

1

Sign in sheet

2

Quick Links & Course Contacts

3

Front Page slideshow - Responsive Slider

2

Homework Organizer

1

Custom Course Menu, Course Menu Block

2

My To Do List

1

Moodle Technical Help Desk

1

Export Glossary to Quiz

1

Flex page menu for Flex page format

1

Meet the Students

1

Demo Student block

1

Flex Page Activity block

1

CSS Theme Tool

1

Assignments Block

1

Course Roster

1

What's Next?
In our next article, we will review how to combine Moodle resources, activities and blocks to create a real course.

01In this article, we will explain how to structure your course into as many sections and sub-sections as you need and in a manner that will help students understand your course organization without being overwhelmed by having all content sections visible on the student's course Home page.

Each Part, when clicked on, displays 4 chapters - and each chapter when clicked on displays 4 sections. This helps the student understand that the course is divided into three parts and each part is divided into four chapters. Providing the student with this structure helps them understand their progress through the learning process.

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Moodle organizes learning into Activities and Resources that are placed in Sections and Topics that are placed in Chapters that are placed in Categories.

A Moodle category is a group of related online courses. For example in the Science category you can have courses on Physics, Chemistry and Biology. A Moodle course is an online series of web pages where teachers can organize their course into a series of lessons which Moodle calls topics and then add learning materials, such as documents, videos and quizzes to each topic.

By default, only administrators and managers can create categories and courses. Once courses are created, and once you have added users to your Moodle website, you can then assign one of more users to the role of teachers to your new course. Teachers can then edit the default Moodle course structure and add more topics and add learning materials to each topic to create their own courses. Course pages can be hidden while they are being created. You can also choose a starting and ending date for your course.

A student can be enrolled in a course by first adding them as a User to your Moodle website. Then select the course and enroll Users to the role of student in your course. Student access to course activities is controlled by their enrollment dates, not course dates. The dates are useful for activity completion in courses.

The course summary and image are shown on the student’s dashboard. The two most common ways to display course materials, activities and resources is by Topic or by Week. The default course is displayed by topic. Topics are organized into a series of numbered topic sections. Alternately, you can display your course in a Weekly format where the sections are named as weeks. Whether you are using the Topic format or the Weekly format, each section can be thought of as a class session. If you only have a few sections or class sessions in your course, you can elect to have all of your sections appear on the same course page (This is the default option). However, if you have a lot of sections or class sessions, or if you have a lot of learning materials in each section, you can elect to display each section as its own web page.

How to Avoid the Moodle Scroll of Death

Even if each section or topic is displayed on its own web page, the problem with the default Moodle Course Structure is that complex courses, with a lot of topics or sections, will be displayed on the Course page as a series of 30 or more topics. Called the Moodle Scroll of Death, displaying all 30 to 40 topics on the same page can result in cognitive overload for students.

For example, each of our 10 courses at College in the Clouds is designed to be taught as a College level course. Each course is divided into nine chapters. Our intention is to provide Information Technology instructors with a curriculum they can use in the typical US College Quarter structure which consists of 9 weeks of instruction and 3 weeks for review and project completion. Each of the 9 weeks or 9 chapters is divided into four sections or class sessions. If the course is structured so that all students maintain the same weekly schedule, then it would be best to display each chapter in a Weekly format with a week for review and project completion after each 3 weeks of chapters.

On the other hand, if your course is a self-paced course where students proceed at their own pace, then use the Topic format rather than the weekly format. Either way, each course chapter would be a Moodle Section and each of our Chapter Sections would be a Moodle Sub-section.

Next go to the Orange School Demo site and see if you can find a course with several sections and sub-sections. The Types of Sports Course is divided into three Sections called Football, Tennis and Rugby. Each has its own Side Menu item, Section page and Section image:

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By contrast the Moodle and Mountaineering course has all sections shown on the same page with Activities divided by a line:

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A Moodle Plugin comes to the Rescue

None of the default options are suitable for a single course with a lot of sections. Thankfully, there is a Moodle Plugin called Flexible Sections Format that can provide us with the ability to create Moodle sub-sections and child sections.

https://moodle.org/plugins/format_flexsections

The flexible sections course format looks similar to the topic format except that there is no parameter “Number of sections”.

Instead, sections can be added and removed as needed. Also, new sections (aka sub-sections) can be added or nested inside of another section. Each section (regardless of its nesting level) can be shown expanded or collapsed. Teacher can change it in edit mode. If a section is displayed collapsed, its name is displayed as a link to the separate page and on this separate page the link “Back to … ” is displayed. If teacher hides a section all nested sub-sections and activities underneath that hidden section become hidden as well. If a section has both activities and subsections, activities are displayed first.

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Sectio edit icons can be used to Control Top Level Sections, highlight, make sub-section top section level, delete section, move section, and hide/show section.

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To download Flexible Sections, go to the following page:

https://moodle.org/plugins/pluginversions.php?plugin=format_flexsections

Then download the latest version 3.5.1. The Downloads page states that the latest version is for Moodle 3.8. However, the plugin appears to work on Moodle version 3.11 and even Moodle version 4.

Install the Flexible Sections Plugin

Go to Site administration, and click Plugins, Install plugins. Then drag the downloaded plugin zip file into the plugin box. Then click Install Plugin.

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Click Continue. This brings up a Server check page. Then click Continue. The next page shows that we have 418 plugins. Click Upgrade Moodle database now. The response was success. Click
Continue. Then click Site Administration in the left side menu.

Then click Courses, Manage Courses. Then select an existing course and click Edit Settings. Then scroll down to Course Format. Change the Course layout to Show one section per page. Then use the Format dropdown to select Flexible sections format.

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Then click Save and Display.

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The Topic sections then appear in boxes and, when editing is turned on, you can now add sections within sections. Here is the typical College in the Clouds course structure we will convert into Moodle Sections:

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Topic 1: Rename Welcome to Better Word Processing

Topic 2: Rename Part I... Creating Documents

Then add four sub-sections (Chapters).

1 Word Processing Terms and Functions

2 Compare 3 Popular Word Processors

3 Page Layout Styles

4 Custom Paragraph Styles

Then in each chapter add 4 more sub-sections (chapter sections such as 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4).

1.1 Word Processing versus Formatting

1.2 Files and Documents versus Folders and Directories

1.3 Document Types versus File Formats

1.4 Using your Computer Clipboard

Topic 3: Rename Part II... Completing Documents

Then add sub-sections for Chapters 5 through 8 and add 4 sub-sections inside of each chapter.

Topic 4 Rename Part III... Complex Documents

Then add sub-sections for Chapters 9 through 12 and add 4 sub-sections inside of each chapter.

Here are the four top level topics:

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For Part 1, click Add a Sub-section:

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Rename the topic:

1 Word Processing Terms and Functions

Then click on the lower Add Subsection to the right to add a section at the same level (later we will click on the upper Add subsection to add sections at a lower level than the current section).

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After the first four chapter sections have been added, go back to Chapter 1 and add the four chapter sub-sections for Chapter 1. Then click on the Part 1 Edit wheel and add a description. Then change Display content from Show expanded to Show collapsed. Then click Save Changes and repeat for Chapters 1, 2, 3 and 4. Then turn editing off. Then open a new web browser and log in as Student 1 and click on the Course to view it.

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The student can click on Part I in the side menu or Part I in the Main Content Area. Either way, the four chapters in Part 1 are displayed.

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The student can then click on Chapter 1 to display the four sections in Chapter 1.

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When the student has finished with the content in any subsection, a link takes them back to the original course section:

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You can make some subsections collapsed and some expanded (such as with 'Reading materials' in the next screenshot). Expanded subsections show their title and content in a similar way to using labels to divide up activities in a regular course format:

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What's Next?
Now that we have a way to display as many sections and sub-sections as needed in as many levels as needed, in the next article, we will review how Moodle helps you to organize and place content inside of each section.

In our previous article, we created a new course called Better Word Processing. We then divided the course into three parts. We then divided each part into four chapters. Each chapter can be thought of as one week of course content. We then divided each chapter into four sections. Each section can be thought of as a single class session. Each class or section has its own web page. In this article, we will add activities and resources to the first section in Chapter 1. This section is called Section 1.1 Word Processing versus Formatting. The first step in adding activities and resources to a Moodle section is to go to the Course Section you want to work on and turn on editing.

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Note that while we could add an activity to Chapter 1, our actual class sections are the sub-sections of Chapter 1. So go to Section 1.1 and click Add an activity or resource. This brings up a screen with 21 learning options. These options are divided into two categories. There are 14 Activities and 7 Resources. Click on Resources:

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Review of 7 Moodle Resources

The first option is called Book. This option allows you to create a series of web pages all linked by a Table of Contents. You can include images videos and other content. Here is an image of what the Book might look like:

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Students can print books or chapters (as PDF) by clicking the gear icon top right of the book:

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The second Resource option is called File. This option allows you to select a file, which can be a document, presentation or video. The file can then be uploaded either from your computer or from a document repository such as Google Drive or Box.

The third resource is called Folder. This option allows you to create and name a folder into which you can place any number of files. Here is what a Folder resource might look like:

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The fourth resource is called IMS Content package. IMS Content is a standard learning format which allows you to upload content created by others regardless of the learning management system.

Here is what an IMS Content Package might look like:

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The fifth resource is called Label. A label can be used as a spacer or divider between other learning content. Labels enable you to add additional text or graphics to your course page. Labels can be used to create custom banners for each weekly learning module/topic, display/embed multimedia on your main page or indent your resources under a label, creating some visual separation from the rest of the content. Here is an example of a label:

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The sixth resource is called Page. A Page resource allows students to see a single, web page within a Moodle section. Instructors can format text, add links, insert images and videos, and modify a page's HTML code with Moodle's text editor. Pages can be better than files as a student does not need to download the page to view it. The student also does not need a Word Processor to view the page. Here is an example of using the Moodle HTML editor to create a page:

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The seventh resource is called URL. This is a link to an existing web page. We will add the following web page link to our Moodle section 1.1:

https://betterwordprocessing.com/part-1-creating-simple-documents/1-word-processing-terms-functions/1-1-word-processing-versus-formatting

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Then click Save and return to course.

Here is what this link will look like to your students:

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Review of 14 Moodle Activities

Activities are different from resources in that resources are static while activities are interactive. Click on the Activities tab to see 14 Moodle Activities:

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The first activity is called Assignment. Assignments allow students to submit work to their teacher for grading. The work may be text typed online or uploaded files of any type the teacher’s device can read. Grading may be by simple percentages or custom scales, or more complex rubrics may be used. Students may submit as individuals or in groups.

The teacher can decide how the assignment should be submitted and choose options for providing students with feedback and/or a grade.

Here is an example of a Moodle assignment from the student view:

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Here is the same assignment from the teacher grading view:

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The second activity is called Chat. This allows the teacher to define chat sessions or specific times to talk with a student or group of students.

The third activity is called Choice. This allows teachers to provide students with a question and set up radio buttons which learners can click to make a selection from a number of possible responses. They can choose one or more options. Choices can be useful as quick poll to stimulate thinking about a topic; to allow the class to vote on a direction for the course, or to gauge progress. Here is an example of a student view of a Choice activity:

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Here is the teacher view:

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The fourth activity is called Database. It allows the teacher and students to collect information about a topic and build an organized database of knowledge.

The fifth activity is called Feedback. This activity allows the teacher to write their own questions to ask students. It is different from the survey activity in that the survey only allows the teacher to choose from a list of pre-written questions.

The sixth activity is called Forum. This activity allows students and teachers to exchange ideas by posting comments as part of a 'thread'. Files such as images and media maybe included in forum posts. The teacher can choose to grade and/or rate forum posts and it is also possible to give students permission to rate each others' posts. Here is an example of a Moodle forum:

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The seventh activity is called Glossary. This activity allows participants to create and maintain a list of definitions, like a dictionary. While it can be set up by the teacher, it can also be used as a collaborative exercise where students also help in building a list of important terms and definitions. The Glossary auto-linking filter will highlight any word in the course which is located in the Glossary

The eighth activity is called H5P. This activity involves selecting from a series of activities from either your own Moodle Content Bank or the h5p.com content bank.

The ninth activity is called Lesson. This activity allows teachers to create 'branching' exercises where students are presented with content and then, depending on their responses, are directed to specific pages. The content may be text or multimedia. Students click on the Lesson icon in the course to access it and, depending on the teacher's settings see a page of information and are prompted to choose an option from a selection of possible responses. Here is an example of a Moodle lesson:

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The teth activity is called Quiz. When creating a Quiz you can either make the questions first and add them to the Quiz, or add a Quiz activity and create the questions as you go along. Here is an example of a Moodle Quiz question:

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The eleventh activity is called SCORM package. A SCORM package is a zipped folder of files and or activities that can be uploaded to a Moodle website.

The twelfth activity is called Survey. The Survey activity offers a number of pre-made questions have been found useful in assessing and stimulating learning in online environments. Teachers can use these to gather data from their students that will help them learn about their class and reflect on their own teaching. Note that the Survey is not customizable; if you want to create your own survey questions, then use the feedback activity instead.

The thirteenth activity is called Wiki. This activity allows students to create a collaborative document by building pages together, similar to Wikipedia. Unlike other collaborative editing programs (such as Google docs) the Wiki is a standard Moodle activity and so no extra permissions or logins are needed. Although Wikis are usually collaborative, it is possible to allow each student to create their own Wiki for individual use. Students click on the Wiki icon in the course to access it and can either go to an existing page (1), activate a draft page by clicking the link (2) or create a new page by adding double square brackets around its title. Here is an example of a Moodle Wiki:

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The fourteenth activity is called Workshop. With this activity, students add submissions which are then distributed among their peers for assessment based on a grading scale specified by the teacher.

Activity Plugins

In addition to the 14 included activities and 7 included resources, Moodle also offers hundreds of additional activity plugins in their Plugins Directory. Here is a link to Moodle Activity Plugins:
https://moodle.org/plugins/browse.php?list=category&id=1

Here is a Table showing the number of plugins available for various categories of Moodle Activities

Moodle Activity Plugin Category

Number of Plugins

Assignment

42

Assignment submissions

25

Assignment Feedback

9

Assignment Types

8

Quiz

141

Quiz Reports

12

Question Types

77

Question Formats

18

Question Behavior

18

Quiz Access Rules

16

Database Activity

10

Workshop Activity

6

Book Activity

8

H5P

1

Attendance

2

Games

1

Checklist

1

Content Pages

1

Appointment Scheduler & Reservations

3

Poster for additional Moodle blocks

1

Student Folder

1

Jitsi Video Conferences

1

Presentations and Portfolios

2

Course Newsletter

1

Learn Foreign Languages Module E-lang Lab

4

Certificates

4

Booking courses and events organizers

3

We will review some of these activities plugins later in this course in our chapter on Moodle Plugins.

What's Next?

In the next article, we will review additional tools and options that Moodle offers to provide student with a better learning experience.